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WEEK 14, 2010

WELLderly News

WELLderlynews.blogspot.com or to request weekly email delivery contact Dale Anderson, MD by email dr@acthappy.com

WEEK 14, 2010 Media News Health Bits

Recent health articles are proof–That an UP-Beat performance that is staged and IN-ACTed can open a cellular pharmacy that dispenses the CHEMISTRY of Health, Happiness & Success. You can bank on IT!

Cognitive behavioral techniques may help binge eaters gain control.

CNN (4/1, Park) reported, researchers at Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research decided to “examine whether a self-guided program would help 123 study participants.”

According to the Los Angeles Times (4/1, Dennis) those “who went through a 12-week, eight-session program” meant to change their thinking and behavior “were much more likely to gain control of their eating than those participants who simply received the various types of treatment they’d normally get in a managed-care setting.” “after 12 weeks, 28.3% of the treatment-as-usual group and 63.5% of the cognitive-behavioral-therapy group had managed to stop binging,”

Dr. WELLderly says Conditioned Response and Cognitive Therapy is much like METHOD ACTORS do when they rehearse and get into the CHEMISTRY of a Role. They become the physiology of the character they are performing. They MAKE a new physiology that feels REAL. Visit the web site ActHappy.com for METHOD ACTING tips. And view article Liquidation Diet.

Dark chocolate may lower risk of heart attacks, strokes.

Bloomberg News (3/31, Cortez) reports that, according to a study published March 31 in the European Heart Journal, “a daily nibble of dark chocolate may slash the risk of heart attacks and strokes by more than one-third.” —”found people who had an average of six grams of chocolate per day — or about one square of a chocolate bar — had a 39 percent lower risk of either a heart attack or stroke,”

Dr. WELLderly celebrates the DARK SIDE of HEALTH. DARK Vegetables, DARK Wine, DARK Coffee, even DARK Beer but in moderation and realizing that a higher percentage of the calories consumed after DARK go to fat. So! If you want to Lighten UP, reduce all caloric intake, after DARK

Study may bolster “hygiene hypothesis.”

The Los Angeles Times (12/11, Roan) “Booster Shots” blog reported that German scientists have unearthed more evidence which supports the “hygiene hypothesis.”, they were able to show “that even exposure to germs during pregnancy may reduce allergy risk in the offspring.” Specifically, exposure to “airborne barnyard microbes” triggered “a mild inflammatory response in the pregnant mice, which was measured by an increased expression of microbe-sensing receptors called TLRs and the production of immune system substances called cytokines.” What’s more, the “exposed mice gave birth to offspring who were resistant to allergies caused by the microbes.

Grandma WELLderly, always wondered, “why those smelly, dirty kids down the road never got sick”. Now we know! A pet in the house also, keeps us healthier. And physicians who work with many contagious patients seldom “catch” their disease. Exposure to different infectious agents may be similar to getting a vaccination against them and “their relatives”. An example, those who were exposed to the flu epidemic in the 70s seemed to escape H1N1.

Dr WELLderly gathers from recent news that patients who do not take Vitamin D3 supplement should give themselves an F, a FAIL, in Disease Prevention. D, D, D, D Ask your doctor!


Study suggests lack of vitamin D may be linked to increased heart risks.

NBC Nightly News (12/1, story 5, 0:25, Williams) reported that individuals “with low Vitamin D levels” may be “twice as likely to suffer from a heart attack or stroke,” according to Dec. 9 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Vitamin D may reduce risk of catching a cold, research suggests.In the Los Angeles Times (2/23) data “found that vitamin D might reduce the risk of catching a cold.” In fact, “after controlling for factors like age, gender, and smoking status” in a sample of 18,883 Americans, investigators discovered that “the effect of vitamin D was greatest for people with asthma — subjects in the group with the lowest vitamin D levels were nearly six times as vulnerable to colds as those in the highest-level group.” As for those “with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, low levels of vitamin D more than doubled the risk of a cold.”

Looking at blood samples, “those with less than 10 nanograms of vitamin D per milliliter of blood, considered low, were nearly 40 percent more likely to have had a respiratory infection than those with vitamin D levels of 30 ng or higher.

Researchers associate vitamin D levels with increased risk of dementia. The New York Times (2/24, D6, Bakalar) reports that, in a study performed at Cambridge University, “low blood levels of vitamin D [were] associated with an increased risk for dementia.” After measuring “blood levels of the vitamin in a representative sample of 1,766 people over 65 and assess[ing] their mental functioning,” British researchers found that “about 12 percent were cognitively impaired, and the lower their vitamin D level, the more likely they were to be in that group.”

Vitamin D may reduce risk of catching a cold, research suggests.In the Los Angeles Times (2/23) data “found that vitamin D might reduce the risk of catching a cold.” In fact, “after controlling for factors like age, gender, and smoking status” in a sample of 18,883 Americans, investigators discovered that “the effect of vitamin D was greatest for people with asthma — subjects in the group with the lowest vitamin D levels were nearly six times as vulnerable to colds as those in the highest-level group.” As for those “with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, low levels of vitamin D more than doubled the risk of a cold.”

Looking at blood samples, “those with less than 10 nanograms of vitamin D per milliliter of blood, considered low, were nearly 40 percent more likely to have had a respiratory infection than those with vitamin D levels of 30 ng or higher.

Researchers associate vitamin D levels with increased risk of dementia. The New York Times (2/24, D6, Bakalar) reports that, in a study performed at Cambridge University, “low blood levels of vitamin D [were] associated with an increased risk for dementia.” After measuring “blood levels of the vitamin in a representative sample of 1,766 people over 65 and assess[ing] their mental functioning,” British researchers found that “about 12 percent were cognitively impaired, and the lower their vitamin D level, the more likely they were to be in that group.”


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